Odin & Baldr

I don’t often post but I do when something particularly moves me.  This is a wonderful piece written by Tim Miller over at Word and Silence and also published here.  Thank you Mr Miller.

ODIN & BALDR

Tim Miller

The High One heard the lowest prophecy:
Already riddled with the worst of dreams,
His boy Baldr would be killed by his brother.
And worse: another brother would avenge
Him, family hacking down family.
And worse: These murders would lead to the end,
To three winters of war and three more years
Of only winter, and all swept away.

Old grey Odin went to the Underworld
And avoided the hall to call on the graves,
And he raised there a reluctant seeress
Who complained, “I am covered in winters,
I am covered in mornings and evenings,
How dare you wake me from this my long death.
You know already what you would deny:
Mead down here is being brewed for Baldr,
For your boy, the dead hall and the high seat
Are being readied for him, for the world’s
Folding over—for your own death, Odin.”

And at Baldr’s funeral the High One
Held this knowledge close as the pyre went up,
As the burning ship was pushed to water,
As it was given to wind and the earth,
As Odin bent and whispered to his boy
What none could hear and few would ever know,
Mourning for a son, a family, a world,
The heavy inevitability.

 

Tim Miller’s most recent book is the long narrative poem, To the House of the Sun (S4N Books). His other fiction and poetry have appeared widely. He writes about poetry, history and religion at www.wordandsilence.com.

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About norsestormdragon

I am heathen. My soul is ancient. I am a warrior but I do not bear arms. My belief is that we are all here as guardians of Midgard, not as despoilers of Jord. I follow the Old Ways, the gods of the north. My beliefs are primal and dark. I am a Healer - working with nature to heal. View all posts by norsestormdragon

One response to “Odin & Baldr

  • Tim Miller

    Many thanks for reposting my poem here. The stories from some traditions beg to be retold & are easily remade; for whatever reason the Norse & Eddic material are hard to write again, so I was especially happy when this poem appeared, at least approximating the doomed tone & grave mood of the originals. I’m glad you thought so too.

    Liked by 1 person

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